kitchen table math, the sequel: the confidence gap

Friday, March 30, 2007

the confidence gap



source:
How Well Are American Students Learning?
larger version here


Of course, this is why we're so damn creative.

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

Because the more math and science you know the more atrophied your brain becomes.

Dee dee deeee.

Quoted snark from a blogger http://bendegrow.com/?p=1105
on reaction of legislators to proposal for increase in math and science requirements for graduation in his area. (Rejected because it might stifle creativity)

"My contention is by forcing every child into this narrow curriculum, we are not making them more innovative, we are not making them more creative,” the Colorado Springs Democrat said, citing a national report that calls a well-rounded education the “passport to a job in which creativity and innovation are the key to a good life.”

The Witwer plan, Merrifield said, would make students “more regimented and more lock-step (with) less ability to think outside the box.”

Dee dee dee reference: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0h0z6vkcY10

Catherine Johnson said...

How many civil rights would forceable internment of pundits and legislators for the purpose of re-education in the fundamentals of cognitive science violate?

Do we know?

LynnG said...

Actually, the self-assessment is probably pretty accurate. American students are right that they are pretty good at math most of the time, because they are only expected to master 3rd grade math by the time they reach the 6th grade. Who wouldn't think they are good at math when the bar is set so low.

Plus, the kids attend assemblies and morning meetings where they are repeatedly told that they are good at math. The chart just demonstrates that we've been incredibly successful in our #1 mission: improve math self-esteem.

Instructivist said...

["My contention is by forcing every child into this narrow curriculum, we are not making them more innovative, we are not making them more creative,” the Colorado Springs Democrat said, citing a national report that calls a well-rounded education the “passport to a job in which creativity and innovation are the key to a good life.”]

These contortions are breathtaking.

Maybe this Colorado Springs Democrat thinks that math and science proficiency will give students a bulge or dealing with too many powers of two will make them square and they will no longer be well-rounded.

Do you become well-rounded, innovative and creative by remaining ignorant?

Catherine Johnson said...

lol!

Andy Lange said...

Hmmm. Before this, the only context in which I'd heard of Colorado Springs was as the location of the Air Force Academy (where preumably everyone has actually learded some math already, and must follow the fairly strict code of conduct of the military).

I suppose when joining all the others whose job is asking for money, "creativity and innovation are the key to a good life" since only those who stand out are likely to get any significant "donations".