kitchen table math, the sequel: In The House of Mirrors; It depends

Thursday, November 26, 2009

In The House of Mirrors; It depends

Is the goal of public education social or academic? Think you know the answer don't you?

Don't get your child's schooling methods in front of a judge. The answer just may fool you.

Read about a 10 year old, home schooled girl, acknowledged to be at or above her grade level being forced to attend public school. Put down that turkey sandwich and get back to it...

14 comments:

TerriW said...

Well, considering that everyone that I deal with who vehemently objects to homeschooling only brings up various socialization reasons, I feel like I know the answer.

None of them try to contest the academic merits. Well, occasionally there's a high school level lab science objection, but since I, personally, took all of my "high school" lab sciences at the local community college up the road, even that objection doesn't fly very far. (You'd make a better case for foreign language, I think.)

(I have had one friend tell me in all seriousness that it was "un-American" to homeschool.)

Anonymous said...

I read the article. *sigh*

Allison said...

Honestly, I didn't even get upset reading this story or the Kersten one you posted below.

I am unfazed. That's because I *know* what educators think school is for is proper socialization.

They are molding minds.

Paul B said...

I have a question for knowledgeable home schoolers...

Has there ever been a court challenge to the unfairness of schooling your child at your own expense, while receiving no benefit from the public funding of schooling?

It seems to me that a case could be made under the takings provisions of most state constitutions that this is blatantly unfair. In my own state, the constitution says you can't have property (taxes take money which is property) taken from you without "reasonable compensation."

I can see how taking my taxes in return for providing schooling is reasonable compensation. I can't see how taking my taxes (for education) and then stiffing me because I am providing the service it was taken for, is reasonable compensation.

ChemProf said...

This is an argument that goes back years. I was a CTY kid back in the day, and kept getting ahead of what my Junior High and High School could offer. By senior year, I was out by 10 am, taking classes at the local state school.

I was talking to my mother about this recently, and she (a public school teacher with 40+ years in the classroom) said "well, I didn't send you to school to be educated, I sent you for the socialization." I know she always argued that I needed to be in the regular classroom because my presence benefited the other kids, which as an adult seems basically nuts.

Niels Henrik Abel said...

Well, it makes perfect sense if the goal of [re]education is [indoctrinating young minds in groupthink] inculcating young minds as to what is a socially acceptable worldview.

(Sorry, the Blogger combox won't let me utilize strikethroughs.)

palisadesk said...

Legally, I'm pretty sure that argument won't fly. It is considered constitutional to tax citizens who don't drive to build highways, and people with no children pay taxes for public education. Roads and public education are both considered public goods and so support can fairly be required of all taxpayers. National parks, airports, public transit systems and other benefits also receive tax funds and are not used by everyone.

People have won court cases where they have been able to demonstrate that the school district failed to provide an appropriate education, and thus was responsible for paying the fees for a private education (go to the Wrightslaw site and search for "Joe James"). But a person who chooses homeschooling cannot make the same argument.

Crimson Wife said...

The really outrageous thing about the NH case is that the girl in questions attends her local government-run school on a part time basis. It's not like her mom keeps her isolated at home 24/7. The only objections seem to be religiously-motivated and THAT is a violation of the 1st Amendment IMHO.

Paul B said...

How about a different tack...

Is it not discriminatory to deny the per pupil funds to a home schooler? Home schoolers are engaging in a legally sanctioned activity. How is this any different than denying access to a publicly funded water fountain because of race? The government is taxing all for a public good but not dispersing the funds equitably to all the sources of schooling.

Paul B said...

How about a different tack...

Is it not discriminatory to deny the per pupil funds to a home schooler? Home schoolers are engaging in a legally sanctioned activity. How is this any different than denying access to a publicly funded water fountain because of race? The government is taxing all for a public good but not dispersing the funds equitably to all the sources of schooling.

TerriW said...

This is actually a somewhat contentious topic among homeschoolers -- many states *do*, in fact, offer some sorts of reimbursement for curriculum, and many homeschoolers do not want it.

Reasoning? Govt money always has strings attached, and different homeschool families have different ideas of just how many strings they would like to deal with. In some states, you cannot use religious materials and still be reimbursed, which is not exactly shocking. And I have heard of some cases where secular materials purchased from a religious company (I believe it was Sonlight, which has about 90% secular materials) have been refused reimbursement.

Some folks just don't want to have to report to the state what curriculum they are using.

Homeschoolers are actually a pretty wide and varied demographic, so it's hard to make sweeping statements. But there are a good chunk that don't want the govt involved in their schooling, to the point of even not taking govt money that is offered.

rocky said...

As much as I disagree with the father, he is apparently still paying child support, so maybe his views should be considered too.

Crimson Wife said...

Rocky- if the custodial mom had wanted to send the child to a private or charter school, I seriously doubt the judge would've ordered enrollment in the local traditional public school. Why, then, is homeschooling treated differently?

Anonymous said...

Exactly,CW.

>Has there ever been a court challenge to the unfairness of schooling your child at your own expense, while receiving no benefit from the public funding of schooling?

Same as if you're private schooling.

The judge states that "socialization" of institutionally school students is better, as if this is some incontestable statement. However, the only research done on the subject has found that as a group, homeschoolers are more loterate of others of opposing views. That's because schools teach that "tolerance" means agreeing with them. Period.