kitchen table math, the sequel: Carnegie Hall

Monday, March 28, 2011

Carnegie Hall

from Dr. John Chung's SAT Math:
Achieving a perfect score on any math exam is quite simple. Though this may sound cliched, all it takes is practice. Practice by taking as many mock tests as you can, and take the time to go through and correct all of your incorrect answers. Keep your mistakes in mind as you take your next mock test.

Since 1992,1 have personally helped more than 50 students each year achieve perfect scores on the SAT Math, SAT II Math I & II, and AP Calculus AB & BC exams. As you might imagine, during my many years of teaching, I have gone through almost every single SAT Math test preparation book out there. I have come to realize that every book is loaded down with explanations and not enough tests! What a waste of money!

Therefore, it is my honor to introduce to you my first test preparation book, Dr. John Chung's SAT Math. There are no tricks or fast-track methods in this book. I have put together 20 mock exams, complete with answers and explanations, to help you PRACTICE your math test taking skills. These are the mock exams that I have used in my private tutoring sessions with my own students, most of whom have gone on to achieve perfect scores on the SAT Math exam.

Special thanks to my latest star students, Angela Lao, Priya Vohra, Devi Mehrotra, Donna Cheung, Jennifer Wong, Amos Han, and Shalini Pammal, who provided invaluable feedback on the format of this book and assisted in the final proofreading session. They all achieved a perfect score on the math section of the PSAT, SAT Math, and SAT II Math I and H.

I hope this book helps you as much as it has helped my students.

Dr. John Chung
President, NYEA
Dr. John Chung's SAT Math

7 comments:

Catherine Johnson said...

Asians seem to be aware of the basal ganglia in a way Americans are not....

Crimson Wife said...

Practice is necessary but not sufficient. Just like practice would make me a better golfer but no Michelle Wie or a better pianist but no Vladimir Horowitz, practice is only going to lead to a perfect 800 for students with the innate math ability.

Crimson Wife said...

That said, Dr. Chung's book could very well lead the average student to improve enough to get him/her into a better tier school (say from a 500 M to a 600 M).

SiouxGeonz said...

Practice is great if you already have some idea what you're doing. It widens ye olde Matthew effect, otherwise, and those that know something, learn more and those that don't have enough background get frustrated and even more confused.
THat said, there is nothing like simulating the test and an awful lot of students leave out that part and then wonder why "test anxiety" gets in the way... sometimes it is test anxiety, but sometimes it's having "practiced" with the solutions manual at your side.

SteveH said...

"I have come to realize that every book is loaded down with explanations and not enough tests!"

Since my son is a freshman, I will be doing tests to see for myself whether it takes a Horowitz or not. If you start years ahead, do you count that as test prep? One thing I've noticed is that you can get great grades in AP track classes, but not get the preparation you need. I think it's very important to examine each question afterwards, both the correct ones and the incorrect ones.

Grace Nunez said...

Special thanks to my latest star students, Angela Lao, Priya Vohra, Devi Mehrotra, Donna Cheung, Jennifer Wong, Amos Han, and Shalini Pammal,...

Sounds like the kinds of students who staff our local Kumon center. :)

Catherine Johnson said...

I know.

There's a whole sub-culture of Asian SAT math prep ---

All Kumon grads, no doubt.

I'll post some passages from Arvin Vohra next.