kitchen table math, the sequel: let's not and say we did, part 3

Monday, December 27, 2010

let's not and say we did, part 3

“Look, this is what you need to do. So like it or not, do it.”
A principal pushing teachers to raise expectations and adopt an inquiry model

quoted in Marshall Memo 307
A Weekly Round-up of Important Ideas and Research in K-12 Education
October 26, 2009
Raising expectations AND adopting an inquiry model is going to be H-E-double hockey sticks for the kids.

Also...."pushing"?

"Like it or not, do it" is pushing?

Not shoving?

let's not and say we did
let's not and say we did, part 2
let's not and say we did, part 3

4 comments:

gasstationwithoutpumps said...

This seems to call out for teacher inquiry: "Why?"

Actually, an inquiry model can be excellent instruction in the hands of a highly skilled teacher. The trick is in guiding the students to ask questions that actually move them forward, rather than chasing around in circles forever. It is a difficult art.

Catherine Johnson said...

oh gosh, yes - asking a good question - and then asking a SERIES of good questions - is terrifically difficult

I think we should distinguish, though, between 'pure inquiry' and 'guided inquiry' which is what I see you as talking about

Knowledge Based Science said...

Carnegie Learning has a series of math teaching "webinars."

http://www.carnegielearning.com/webinars/


I'd be interested in hearing reviews from any math people.


- Hainish

SteveH said...

"I'd be interested in hearing reviews from any math people."

Low expectations hidden by fancy talk.