kitchen table math, the sequel: histogeomegraph: preventing the tragedy of content isolation

Thursday, November 8, 2007

histogeomegraph: preventing the tragedy of content isolation

from Minneapolis, Vicky S sends this poster session from the upcoming NAGC convention:
Presentation Title Histogeomegraph: Connecting History, Geometry, and Writing (listed under "National Presentations")

Presenters Betty K. Wood, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR; Abby Dragland, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR

Category/Topic Math & Science

Level of Session Intermediate

Date/Time 11/9/2007 2:45 PM - 3:45 PM

Location Minneapolis Convention Center - Lower Level

Description

Research shows that the use of interdisciplinary units in teaching skills is more effective than teaching skills in isolation. Eliminating content isolation helps students recognize the interconnectedness of subjects. Euler, Descartes, Escher, Pascal, Plato, Carroll, Dudeney, and Loyd are examples of ancient to contemporary individuals who made contributions to the study of mathematics. Discovering the history of the person, playing with their mathematics, and reporting the findings can be incorporated into exciting activities. The objective of this session is to make teachers comfortable with combining these elements into meaningful activities. They receive examples of activities from these historic personalities
Isn't it Dave Barry who always says you can't make this stuff up?
gifted

10 comments:

Doug Sundseth said...

I'd be willing to bet that the only significant geometry presented will be the line that connects superficial history to bad writing. Any takers?

SteveH said...

"... the only significant geometry presented will be the line that connects superficial history to bad writing."

And the line will have a singularity in it. e.g. black hole.

Myrtle Hocklemeier said...

This year I learned how to distribute negation in logic: Maybe interdisciplinary in this context means "not math and not history."

This might be really surprising but the thing that helped me to become a better math teacher to my kid was simply learning more math.
Does "Research shows" that?

Doug Sundseth said...

I think we can trust to the mysteries of tautology and the identity property of equality for that. 8-)

VickyS said...

You know, I just couldn't resist googling that word: histogeomegraph. The only thing that popped up was this blog!

Ben Calvin said...

Another thing to do in class while not teaching math skills.

And let's make sure we have a breakout session about it at the next convention!

Eric said...

Does the content differ from More Joy of Mathematics: Exploring Mathematical Insights and Concepts, which is two for two with five-star reviews at amazon.com?

"Research shows" and pretentious invented words are obligatory for ed PhD's; you've got to read past them to see if there is content. Assuming you recover from cringing at the title and first sentence.

VickyS said...

Well, what we have here appears to be little more than "math appreciation," which is the basis for far too much coursework these days. So much for "college prep" and the US's big push toward "STEM" (science, technology, engineering and math) curricula.

Actually, I don't have it in for math appreciation per se. I think there are some people who have a knack for, and interest in, math; and others who don't. We can and should educate both groups to basic proficiency in everyday (small "e") math, and for a lot of people, beyond that, math appreciation is going to be just fine. But the kid who intends to major in math, engineering or a physical science, as we all know, needs a lot more. Sometimes I think part of the problem with the K-12 mindset is that if *everyone* can't do it, then *no one* is going to be given the opportunity to do it--thereby explaning the lack of rigor (and producing, as a side benefit, more "equal outcomes").

Catherine Johnson said...

not math and not history

lol

Catherine Johnson said...

The only thing that popped up was this blog!

Hey --- that's a Googlewhack!

(Isn't it?)

Cool.